18milesperhour:

CYCLING SAFETY: DO AS I SAY, NOT AS I DO. Don’t lock your phone. Period.  If you carry your phone as a safety device on rides, there’s no need to passcode lock it.  But there are many, many reasons not to. Here’s a big one.  When I had my latest bad crash, my phone was locked.  For the first couple hours I was in and out of consciousness. Mostly not.  In one of my rare moments of consciousness, face-down in some rocks, a stranger was holding my phone in front of my face begging me to remember the code (and my name). I got lucky and entered the right one (on the third try) and dialed my wife’s number. Then, went nighty-night again.  I get it wrong and my wife may not have known what happened. I. Got. Lucky.  So forget the passcode. Because heaven forbid, you may forget the passcode. - Brian


Sorry, but I disagree with this. I ride in some areas where crime is an issue and I sure don’t want someone having access to my email, etc. Not to mention that your phone could break during any crash. I ride with dog tags made at a vending machine with my wife’s name and cell # along with my blood type. (Got that blood type idea from my regular dog tags.) Of course you could also just put the info on a piece of paper inside a plastic bag.  Be safe out there!

18milesperhour:

CYCLING SAFETY: DO AS I SAY, NOT AS I DO.
Don’t lock your phone.
Period.
If you carry your phone as a safety device on rides, there’s no need to passcode lock it.
But there are many, many reasons not to. Here’s a big one.
When I had my latest bad crash, my phone was locked.
For the first couple hours I was in and out of consciousness. Mostly not.
In one of my rare moments of consciousness, face-down in some rocks, a stranger was holding my phone in front of my face begging me to remember the code (and my name). I got lucky and entered the right one (on the third try) and dialed my wife’s number. Then, went nighty-night again.
I get it wrong and my wife may not have known what happened.
I. Got. Lucky.
So forget the passcode.
Because heaven forbid, you may forget the passcode.
- Brian

Sorry, but I disagree with this. I ride in some areas where crime is an issue and I sure don’t want someone having access to my email, etc. Not to mention that your phone could break during any crash.
I ride with dog tags made at a vending machine with my wife’s name and cell # along with my blood type. (Got that blood type idea from my regular dog tags.) Of course you could also just put the info on a piece of paper inside a plastic bag.
Be safe out there!

(via freshrosemary)

Tags: bicycle safety